New brunswick speed dating

A place around which we can build German industry and commerce, a practicable harbor and railroad connections to all parts of the country." These two lines became a sort of a themesong or leitmotif in the advertising campaign and were frequently repeated as a motto at the beginning of advertisements in German-American newspapers.

The Association evidently invested a great deal of money in a vigorous and far-reaching advertising campaign in all American cities with a sizable German population.

A tourist who has an ear for German sounding names or a college student who ever took a course in German civilization will probably look somewhat perplexed if he opens the local telephone directory or if he sees the names on the street signs.

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Direct immigration from the German fatherland might be channeled into Egg Harbor to swell the ranks of the settlers. A refuge for all German countrymen who want to combine and enjoy American freedom with German Gemtlichkeit, sociability and undisturbed happiness.

In 1859 the Association put out a special pamphlet under the heading "Was wir wollen What we want." The answer developed the entire program of the project. A place to develop German folk life, German arts and sciences, especially music.

They visualized two cities, one, called Pomona, stretching over four square miles immediately north of the railroad tracks.

A second city, called Gloucester, should be erected a few miles further north around Gloucester Lake.

Many German newcomers who had felt the pressure of the Knownothings were in a receptive mood when they read the advertisements inviting them to a purely German settlement in the New World.

It was this combination of two phenomena, both typical of the United States in the midcentury, railroad expansion and anti-immigrant feelings, to which Egg Harbor City owed its existence.

Egg Harbor City, a charming and pleasantly sedate town of 5,800 inhabitants, inland between Philadelphia and Atlantic City, is neither a city nor a harbor.

Remains the egg, for which the Jersey folklore has a quick and ready answer, to us so unconvincing that we have to relegate this information into a footnote.

The biggest wave of anti-immigrant resentment in American history, a nativistic movement called Knownothingism, swept the country.

Irish and German immigrants became the main targets for this militant and aggressive group.

With each share the new settler and stockholder acquired a 20 acre farm and the claim for a building lot 100 by 150 foot within the "town" (in the narrower sense of the word).

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